Geography

GCSE – AQA Geography A specification – external assessment
Unit 1 – physical Geography (restless earth, coasts, eco-systems)
Unit 2 – Human Geography (population, development gap and tourism)

Term 1
Key Learning Objectives Learners appreciate that the Earth’s crust is unstable and that unique landforms are formed as a result of this, however, they appreciate that these features are used as a resource as people adapt to living in these conditions.

Learners recognise that volcanoes are hazards which result from tectonic activity, but that the primary and secondary effects are both positive and negative. Furthermore, learners see that the impact of a super volcano would have global implications.

Learners can explain why earthquakes occur at constructive, destructive and conservative margins and that a tsunami is a specific secondary effect of an earthquake, which have a devastating effect on coastal areas. Finally, learners acknowledge that the effects of earthquakes and responses to them differ due to contrasts in levels of wealth.

Key Activities / Homework Learners will recognise the distribution of plates, and the contrasts between continental and conservative plates, then differentiate between constructive, destructive and conservative plate margins. Next, we will locate and account for the formation of Fold Mountains, Ocean trenches, Shield and composite volcanoes. We will then complete a case study of fold mountains and focus on human usage.

We will identify the characteristics of different types of volcano before completing to study on a volcano. The study has a focus on primary and secondary affects, positive and negative effects, immediate and long term responses as well as monitoring and predicting eruptions

Later in the unit we will study the characteristics of a super volcanoes and consider the likely effect of their eruption.

Finally we will compare an earthquake from a poor part of the world with one from a rich part and consider causes, primary and secondary effects, immediate and long term responses and the need to predict, protect and prepare. Learners will contrast and compare these case studies.

Assessments Learners will be tested at the midpoint and end point of each unit using GCSE past papers which will be marked with rigour by existing examiners
Suggest reading & support materials Geography by its very nature is a contemporary subject so learners need to watch the popular press for stories that frequently present themselves

 

Term 2
Key Learning Objectives We will study how an ecosystem is made up of plants and animals and the physical factors affecting them (Climate and soil), how these different parts interrelate and depend on each other and the balance between the different parts. We will see how different ecosystems are found in different parts of the world due to the influence of climate and soils. We will focus on three main ecosystems, deciduous woodland, deserts and rainforests as well as the management of these areas.
Key Activities / Homework In this unit, learners will explore

The concept of an ecosystem.

The use of a small scale ecosystem to illustrate the parts of an ecosystem and how it works, including consumers, decomposers, food chain/web, nutrient cycling and producers.

The balance between the components.

The impact of changing one component on the others.

The global distribution of three ecosystems – temperate deciduous forest, tropical rainforest and hot deserts. The characteristics of the vegetation, climate and soils for each ecosystem.

The ways in which the vegetation in temperate deciduous forest, tropical rainforest and hot deserts adapts to the climate and soils.

Ways in which the deciduous woodland is managed – controlled felling, replanting, planning for recreational use and conservation.

The causes of deforestation: farming, slash and burn and commercial ranching, logging, road building, mineral extraction and population pressure. The economic, social, political and environmental impacts of deforestation.

The sustainable management of tropical rainforest – selective logging, replanting, education, ecotourism, protection, reducing demand for tropical hardwoods and reducing debt.

In this unit, learners will explore

The concept of an ecosystem.

The use of a small scale ecosystem to illustrate the parts of an ecosystem and how it works, including consumers, decomposers, food chain/web, nutrient cycling and producers.

The balance between the components.

The impact of changing one component on the others.

The global distribution of three ecosystems – temperate deciduous forest, tropical rainforest and hot deserts. The characteristics of the vegetation, climate and soils for each ecosystem.

The ways in which the vegetation in temperate deciduous forest, tropical rainforest and hot deserts adapts to the climate and soils.

Ways in which the deciduous woodland is managed – controlled felling, replanting, planning for recreational use and conservation. The causes of deforestation: farming, slash and burn and commercial ranching, logging, road building, mineral extraction and population pressure. The economic, social, political and environmental impacts of deforestation.

The sustainable management of tropical rainforest – selective logging, replanting, education, ecotourism, protection, reducing demand for tropical hardwoods and reducing debt.

Assessments Learners will be tested at the midpoint and end point of each unit using GCSE past papers which will be marked with rigour by existing examiners
Suggest reading & support materials Geography by its very nature is a contemporary subject so learners need to watch the popular press for stories that frequently present themselves

 

Term 3
Key Learning Objectives Learners recognise that the growth of tourism has led to an exploitation of environments, those most at risk are the more extreme environments. To be sustainable we need to see a development of ‘ecotourism’ projects. Learners appreciate that mass tourism, although advantageous for an area, needs managing to reduce the likelihood of long term damage. On the national scale learners should know that, in the UK, effective management will be key to the continued prosperity of the tourist industry in the UK.
Key Activities / Homeworks In this unit learners will explore

The global increase in the tourist industry and consider the potential of cities, mountains and coasts as areas of potential tourist development.

The economic importance of tourism to countries in contrasting parts of the world.

The impact of Tourism on the UK economy and assess the impact of external factors on visitor numbers.

The tourist area/resort life cycle model.

The impact of mass tourism and consider the positive and negative impact of it on an environment and economy.

How areas maintain the importance of tourism whilst reducing its negative effects.

The attraction of extreme environment holidays, suggest why demand has increased and considered the impact of extreme holidays.

Assessments Learners will be tested at the midpoint and end point of each unit using GCSE past papers which will be marked with rigour by existing examiners
Suggest reading & support materials Geography by its very nature is a contemporary subject so learners need to watch the popular press for stories that frequently present themselves